Are wine varietals capitalized?

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Certainly the varietal name is capitalized when written as part of the wine name (e.g., Thomas Pinot Noir). But one could be forgiven for going lower case when writing “a bottle of pinot noir.” Similarly, one could be granted latitude for “a bottle of Pinot Noir.”

Should wines be capitalized?

Which brings us to … Wines that are named after or for a region or place are always capitalized–example: again Bordeaux and Burgundy, but also Cognac, Champagne, Rioja, Chianti, Lambrusco, Cava, Asti and more. Wines that call themselves one of the following, but are not actually from the corresponding region should never be uppercased.

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Do varietal names have to be capitalized?

So if a varietal name describes a county where the people who live in that county capitalize it, does it carry that same prestige to its other modify-ees? (groan) An English saddle is never lower case.

Can wine varietals be capped?

The only exception to this rule that we found–other than some sources suggesting varietals can, in fact, be capped–is when a wine grape is actually named after the region where it’s grown. Such is the case for Burgundies and Bordeauxs, which are both regions in France and also the name of grape varietals from those regions.

Is the name of a grape variety capitalized?

The New York Times and Slate.com don’t capitalize the names of grape varieties but practically everyone else does. What, then, is the correct usage? This may seem a little geeky or pedantic but it’s important for anyone who writes about wine. I seem to revisit this questi Is it Cabernet Sauvignon or cabernet sauvignon?


Pinot Noir, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz, Syrah – Red Wine Guide


More about Are wine varietals capitalized?


1. How To Capitalize Wines – A Murmur Creative Copy Guide

Mar 01, 2017 · Wines named for their grape varietal are not capitalized. Both The New York Times and the Associated Press Stylebook follow this convention. …

From murmurcreative.com

3. Do you capitalize names of wines? – Alcoholic Beverage Blog

Actually, all plant variety (not varietal) names should be capitalized. Hence, it’s Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Chardonnay, etc, just as it’s Minneola tangelo, Granny Smith apple, Haas avocado, etc. But note that it is Pinot noir, Pinot blanc, Pinot gris, etc.

From eaglecastlewinery.com

4. Capitalization of Wine Varietal Names – DrinksForum

Jun 25, 2004 · For example, cabernet sauvignon and merlot wouldn’t be capitalized but Muller-Thurgau and Ehrenfelser would. So that is what you would see in a newspaper. Most wine magazines, however, have adopted an alternative style, which is to capitalize wine grape varieties as proper nouns. But that isn’t always consistent from magazine to magazine.

From www.drinksforum.com

5. Should Grape Varieties Be Capitalized? – De Long

Jun 04, 2016 · Is it Cabernet Sauvignon or cabernet sauvignon? The New York Times and Slate.com don’t capitalize the names of grape varieties but practically everyone else does. What, then, is the correct usage? This may seem a little geeky or pedantic but it’s important for anyone who writes about wine. I seem to revisit this questi

From www.delongwine.com

7. Does one capitalize varietal names? – West Coast Wine

Jun 20, 2003 · According to standard scientific practice, you capitalize the names of the grape varieties: Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay. You do not capitalize the adjectives of those grape varieties. Thus an ampellographer would tell you that it is Pinot noir, not Pinot Noir. PW

From www.westcoastwine.net

8. FAQ Item – The Chicago Manual of Style Online

In my dictionary Chablis is capitalized, cabernet sauvignon and merlot are lowercase but “often capitalized,” prosecco is lowercase, barbera is lowercase. I edit a lot of books containing wine names, including one book solely about wine varietals, and there does not appear to be an industry-specific source. A. We appreciate your confusion. Although CMOS isn’t likely to take on …

From www.chicagomanualofstyle.org

9. Wines.com – Wine Varietals A-Z

Wine “ varietal s” simply means wine made from a specific wine grape. Varietal wine s in the United States are often named after the dominant grapes used in making the wine . Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Chardonnay, Riesling, Pinot Noir, and Chenin Blanc are examples of grape varieties. When a wine bottle shows a varietal designation on the label (like Merlot) it means …

From www.wines.com

10. Thanks for the whiskey/whisky lesson. Now what about …

As for grapes, they are not proper names and thus should not, I would argue, be capitalized. In English, we capitalize proper names such as Vancouver, Mars and Château Lafite.

From www.theglobeandmail.com


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