Can something be watertight but not airtight?

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Is there a difference between airtight and watertight?

If no helium is leaking, then certainly no refrigerant will leak either. Airtight will always be watertight, but watertight does not also mean airtight. If something that is watertight is airtight, it will just be called airtight since that term encompasses both.

Why is a vessel watertight but not air tight?

I think (and this is just wild speculation, really) that the primary reason that the a vessel is watertight, but not air tight (and other gasses) is capilary action: Consider that the gaps are very narrow, which means that the capilary effect is very strong, and, simultaneously, that the force due to pressure difference is very small.

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What are some examples of things that are watertight and airtight?

If something that is watertight is airtight, it will just be called airtight since that term encompasses both. I always thought of balloons as an example. If you tie a balloon off with some air in it, it will deflate gradually over a few days.

Can water come out of an airtight container?

If you’re just worried about it getting splashed or falling into a pool or whatever, something that is airtight will keep water out too. However, if you want to take it SCUBA diving or send it into deep water by other means, an airtight container could easily be crushed if it wasn’t designed to withstand high pressure.


Air-tight vs. Vacuum-tight


More about Can something be watertight but not airtight?


1. If something is watertight but not airtight can you still condense …

This is why something can be waterproof yet not airtight. If it is not airtight then water vapor, water in its gas phase, can enter it just like air. If you then cool off the object to below the dew point, water vapor will condense to liquid inside the object.

From www.quora.com

2. Is airtight tighter than watertight? – Physics Stack Exchange

Mar 16, 2018 · That said, water vapor is a constituent of air, so something that is truly 100% airtight is also watertight: it does not allow water molecules to pass. As has already been pointed out in comments, this is not necessarily true in the other direction: there are constituents of air that are smaller than water molecules, so presumably there is a hole size that will permit some …

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From physics.stackexchange.com

3. Can something be watertight, but not airtight? – reddit

Technically yes. Water molecules are larger than air molecules and water is also more dense and viscous so you could certainly have something that is water tight but not air tight.

From www.reddit.com

4. Can something be ‘air tight’ but not ‘water tight’? – LetsRun.com

Jun 04, 2009 · Your asshole is a good example of something that is watertight and yet not airtight. You can dive into a pool without filling up with water and yet you can still fart underwater. 1

From www.letsrun.com

5. ELI5: If something is airtight is it also watertight? And vice versa?

Airtight will always be watertight, but watertight does not also mean airtight. If something that is watertight is airtight, it will just be called airtight since that term encompasses both. I always thought of balloons as an example. If you tie a balloon off with some air in it, it will deflate gradually over a few days.

From www.reddit.com

6. Air-tight but not water-tight???? – Grasscity

May 11, 2012 · Just because you can’t smell something doesn’t mean it’s airtight, If water can seep out something it’s obviously isn’t sealed from leaks so therefore it can’t be airtight

From forum.grasscity.com

8. Are airtight and watertight the same thing? – The Straight Dope

Dec 21, 2004 · it is possible to have a seal that is watertight but not gas-tight, particularly in a pressurised container – fluids are (generally) so much more dense and viscous than gases that they can get stuck in spaces where gases can be forced through. There are also some plastics that are gas permeable (to some gases), but not water permeable.

From boards.straightdope.com

9. Air tightness vs Water tighness – Physics Forums

Nov 15, 2006 · I think (and this is just wild speculation, really) that the primary reason that the a vessel is watertight, but not air tight (and other gasses) is capilary action: Consider that the gaps are very narrow, which means that the capilary effect is very strong, and, simultaneously, that the force due to pressure difference is very small.

From www.physicsforums.com


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