What is a toothing plane used for?

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What Do They Do? We use toothing planes to give tooth to the surface of ground wood that forms the substrate wood for our veneer work. Toothing creates perfect parallel v-shaped cuts about 1mm (1/32″) apart across the surface of the wood we are veneering.

What is a toothing plane blade?

Though traditional wooden toothing planes and modern toothed blades have become well known among woodworkers, they are still underutilized in contemporary shops. With its extremely high-pitched blade (80° to 90°) and serrated cutting edge, the toothing plane cares little about grain direction and figure.

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What is the pitch of a toothing plane?

A toothing plane is nothing more than a wooden plane with an iron with saw like teeth on the sharp end. The pitch angle can vary anywhere from 60 to 110 degrees. The coarseness of the teeth configuration also vary, and commonly the higher the pitch the finer the teeth.

What is the grain direction of the toothing plane?

With its extremely high-pitched blade (80° to 90°) and serrated cutting edge, the toothing plane cares little about grain direction and figure.

Do you have to sharpen the teeth on a bench plane?

You don’t have to sharpen the teeth as you would on a saw. Instead, sharpen the tool as you would a normal bench plane, with one important exception: do not lap the back. I used to knock the burr off, but lately I just roll with it.


RWW 111 Toothing Planes in Action


More about What is a toothing plane used for?


1. Toothing plane is for more than just veneer by Bill Pavlak

May 23, 2018 · Though traditional wooden toothing planes and modern toothed blades have become well known among woodworkers, they are still …

From www.finewoodworking.com

2. The Period Craftsmen: The Toothing Plane – Blogger

Oct 02, 2015 · The purpose of such a plane was once used to prep all wooden surfaces that were going to be veneered. The striations left by …

From periodcraftsmen.blogspot.com

4. Toothing Planes – ChestofBooks.com

Besides the ordinary planes, the cabinet-maker uses a “toothing” plane. This has a stock similar to the hard wood hand-plane, but the iron, instead of having a cutting edge, presents a series of sharp teeth to the wood. This serrated edge is formed by long narrow grooves on the face of the iron nest the wedge, and when the iron is ground in the usual manner these …

From chestofbooks.com

5. Paul Sellers’ Poor-man’s Toothing Plane Post & Video

May 23, 2014 · We use toothing planes to give tooth to the surface of ground wood that forms the substrate wood for our veneer work. Toothing creates perfect parallel v-shaped cuts about 1mm (1/32″) apart across the surface of the wood we are veneering. Criss-crossing creates a diamond pattern to that end.

From paulsellers.com

6. Toothing plane | Article about toothing plane by The Free Dictionary

toothing plane A carpenter’s plane, the cutting edge of which is formed into a series of small teeth, usually to roughen a surface. McGraw-Hill …

From encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com

7. Toothing plane – definition of Toothing plane by … – The Free …

a plane of which the iron is formed into a series of small teeth, for the purpose of roughening surfaces, as of veneers.

From www.thefreedictionary.com

9. I Made a Wooden Toothing Plane – Wilson Burnham Guitars

Sep 07, 2016 · In the days before the belt sander, a cabinetmaker also used a toothing plane when smoothing such heavily figured woods as curly and bird’s-eye maple. Michael Dunbar, Restoring, Tuning & Using Classic Woodworking Tools , 1989

From www.wilsonburnhamguitars.net

10. Smoothing plane – Wikipedia

A smoothing plane or smooth plane is a type of bench plane used in woodworking.The smoothing plane is typically the last plane used on a wood surface, removing very fine shavings to leave a smooth finish. When used effectively it quickly produces a finish that equals or surpasses that made by sandpaper.. Description and history. The smoothing …

From en.wikipedia.org


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