Why ideal gas cannot be liquefied?

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Ideal gas cannot be liquefied because the intermolecular forces in ideal gas are negligible. In case of negligible intermolecular forces, the molecules will have free random motion. This is possible in gaseous state.

Why can’t you liquefy an ideal gas?

So that’s the reason you cant liquefy an ideal gas. mathematically speaking the compressibility factor is 1.So that’s another reason. (Also ideal gases don’t exist anyway!).

Is it possible to convert an ideal gas into a liquid?

Particles of real substances are attracted to each other and do liquify as they get colder but an ideal gas, if it existed, would not do this. According to the Kinetic theory of gases, there is no attractive force amongst the molecules of an ideal gas. Hence, it is not possible to convert an ideal gas into a liquid.

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Which factors are not considered by the ideal gas law?

Intermolecular forces and molecular size are not considered by the Ideal Gas Law. The Ideal Gas Law applies best to monoatomic gases at low pressure and high temperature. Lower pressure is best because then the average distance between molecules is much greater than the molecular size.

What is an ideal gas?

An “ideal gas” is only a MODEL (approximate and asymptotic) of the “real” gas behavior at low pressures or high temperatures, i.e., very far away from the zone where the “real” gas condenses, either by high pressure or by low temperature.


An ideal gas can never be liquefied because .


More about Why ideal gas cannot be liquefied?


1. Why can real gases be liquefied and ideal gas can not be?

Originally Answered: Although real gases can be liquified , an ideal gas cannot be. Why? 1) Because, ideal gas doesn’t exist. 2) For ideal gas it is assumed that there is no (zero) inter-particle interaction, and in the absence of any such interaction gas can’t be liquified. Also, for ideal gas it is assumed that it is incompressible.

From www.quora.com

3. An ideal gas cannot be liquefied because? – Toppr Ask

Gases liquefy when their component molecules come into contact and interact with each other, this will always happen before absolute zero because real gas particles have volume. But an ideal gas has particles of zero volume, and no intermolecular interactions, by defination. Therefore it can not liquefy.

From www.toppr.com

4. Why can’t real gas be liquefied above a critical temperature?

Consequently, With higher temperature molecules will have greater kinetic energy. Above the critical temperature, molecules will have a large amount of kinetic energy which will be sufficient enough to overcome the intermolecular force of attraction. This is why gas cannot be liquefied above the critical temperature.

From www.quora.com

5. An Explanation of the Ideal Gas Law – ThoughtCo

Apr 02, 2019 · Intermolecular forces and molecular size are not considered by the Ideal Gas Law. The Ideal Gas Law applies best to monoatomic gases at low pressure and high temperature. Lower pressure is best because then the average distance between molecules is much greater than the molecular size.

From www.thoughtco.com

7. Why ideal gas law not obeyed at high pressures/low temp?

Sep 15, 2011 · Postby Chem_Mod » Thu Sep 15, 2011 8:42 am. For high pressure, the gas particles get to be close to each other and the interactions between them cannot be ignored; while for ideal gas we assume that there is no interaction between those particles. When the temperature below critical temperature there may be phase transition–gas will become …

From lavelle.chem.ucla.edu

8. Why can’t an ideal gas be condensed? – Answers

Jun 21, 2011 · See answer (1) Best Answer. Copy. Ideal gases can be condensed, but the ideal gas model may fail for gases at higher temperatures. Wiki User. ∙ 2011-06-21 12:46:42.

From www.answers.com


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